Ashley (getaway_machine) wrote,
Ashley
getaway_machine

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So, I am using todays entry to complete my first challenge from theemdash.
The challenge:
Write a post defining "defenestration," including the etymology of the word. Then write about one historical defenestration. This can be written as a bitterly dry retelling of the event or as historical fiction (though I would recommend fiction).


de·fen·es·tra·tion [dee-fen-uh-strey-shuhn]
–noun
1. the act of throwing a thing or a person out of a window
2. (British) high profile removal of a person from an organization
3. (neologism) the act of removing Windows OS from a computer to install an alternative



Defenestration was first used in the 17th century, to refer to an act of political dissent, most notably to Defenestrations of Prague.
The word comes from Latin de, "out" + finestra, "window."
According to Time Magazine, in 1995 some computer hackers were using it to mean "to exit a screen window."

And because I'm too lazy to write any sort of historical fiction, I'm going with a dry retelling of the Defenestrations of Prague. :P

On May 21, 1618 two Catholic deputies to the Bohemian national assembly and a secretary were tried by an assembly of Protestants for violating the Letter of Majesty (Right of Freedom of Religion), found guilty, and were tossed out of a window and into the dry moat of the castle Hradshin, marking the start of the Thirty Years War.
The Catholics say that the survival of these people was due to divine intervention -- but the Protestants say that it was because they landed in a large pile of manure, which honestly amuses me more.

And I'm calling myself done. :)
Tags: blog 365: em challenge
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